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Our look at
FRACKING NEAR SCHOOLS

 

Drilling and fracking near places like hospitals and schools has been a hot topic for a while, probably since the new style of high volume slick water hydraulic fracturing began in the past ten years. The intensity and industrial nature of these multiple gas well fracks naturally lead to concerns about air pollution and other issues that are critical around sensitive populations, like the infirmed or young children. Children are much more vulnerable to air pollution issues.

Here we take a look at a Marcellus Shale fracking operation that is directly across from a Junior-Senior high school in western Pennsylvania, near the town of McDonald. This December 2011 frac job took place on the 8 Chiarelli wells across from Fort Cherry High School, approximately 2,500 feet away. A second active drilling pad can be seen at the top right of the photo, known as the Aloe Family Unit.
 


 

 

 
Another safety concern around schools, in addition to common air pollutants, should be the explosive levels of gas that can occur during fracking. Air monitoring was done a few miles from this school during a similar hydraulic fracturing operation, and you can find those alarming results here.
 

December 10, 2011
Chiarelli Pad hydraulic fracturing in progress
 
 

Children & Clean Air
Source: Clean Air Council

Trends in Children's Health
Drastic increases in the rates of chronic childhood illnesses are sweeping the United States and rest of the world.

While the causes of these increases are not fully understood, they ultimately lie in an interaction of genetics and the environment. The rate of change is of such a high level that it would be unreasonable to attribute it to a major shift in human genetics. More likely, genetic predispositions are coming to light due to increased pressure from the environmental factors. The majority of evidence indicates that now more than ever, the environment is influencing our health and the health of our children.

· Nearly 5 million children (7%) in the United States suffer from asthma. The rate of prevalence increased by 74% and the number of children dying from asthma increased threefold between 1979 and 1996.

· Childhood cancer rates have risen dramatically, with cancers of the Central Nervous System increasing by 25%, incidences of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia increasing by 20%, and an average increase in all cancer rates of 10%.

Children Are Different From Adults!
Children are both exposed to more pollution and are more susceptible to the effects of this exposure.

· Increased Exposure—Children are exposed to more pollution per unit of body weight than adults are.

· Children breathe, eat, and drink more for their body weight than adults. This increase percentage of intake means that the amount of pollution in our air, food, and water has a much more significant effect on children's health than it does on the health of an adult.

· Children's behavior also increases their exposure to environmental toxicants. Children touch more things and put more things in their mouths as a way of exploring their environment. Also, their close proximity to the ground and car exhaust pipes increases their exposure.

· Increased Susceptibility—Children's bodies react differently to environmental toxicants than adults' do.

· Children are often less able to metabolize and remove foreign compounds than adults. In addition, children's bodies often absorb these compounds at a higher rate than adults do.

· Children's immune systems are still immature and are often not developed enough to provide adequate protection from environmental toxins.

· Children's bodies are still developing, and exposure to environmental toxins has an impact on how this development progresses. Developmental problems can manifest themselves as physical deficits and disorders as well as disorders of the central nervous system resulting in psychological deficits.

· Because children are still at the beginning of their lives, the effects of environmental toxicants have more time to accumulate and manifest themselves.

Air Pollution
Common air pollutants, such as ozone, particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, and sulfur dioxides are associated with increased respiratory illnesses and symptoms, aggravation of asthma, and decreases in lung function in children. One recent study found an association between particulate air pollution and an increased risk of infant mortality.

In 1995, about 18 million children under the age of 10 lived in areas with air quality that did not meet federal standards. Parents can protect children by checking air pollution levels regularly where they live, limiting children's outdoor exercise when air pollution levels are high, and ensuring that the child's school is prepared for smog episodes.

Reforms needed to protect children include improving standards for air pollutants, particularly by implementing the newly revised ozone and particulate matter standards, and adopting more aggressive programs to control air pollution.

 
Wastewater impoundment with rust colored fluids
Fluids from this Carter Impoundment were pumped 2-miles
through temporary plastic pipelines to the Chiarelli frac site
 
Pumping from impoundment for fracking
One of the pumps along 10,000 feet
of dual plastic pipelines
 
Temporary plastic pipelines
Two more fluid pumps along the
circuitous cross country route
 
Valves and couplers in the pipelines
 
Marcellus Shale fluid pumps
Two more pumps near the frack site
 
CHIARELLI PAD
 
CHIARELLI PAD
110 BOWEN ROAD
MCDONALD, PA 15057

MOUNT PLEASANT TOWNSHIP
WASHINGTON COUNTY

RANGE RESOURCES
PERMIT INFORMATION:
ESCGP-1# ESX09-125-0048

GPS: 40.354555 -80.280275

API#s:
1H: 37-125-24395-00
3H: 37-125-24427-01
4H: 37-125-24397-00
8H: 37-125-24398-00
10H: 37-125-24277-00

NOT SHOWN ON SIGN:
6H: 37-125-24426
7H: 37-125-24399
9H: 37-125-24396

(A TOTAL OF 8 CHIARELLI WELLS WERE PERMITTED. THESE WELLS WERE FLARED AT THE END OF DECEMBER 2011)

 

Looking over at Fort Cherry High School
from the entrance to the Chiarelli Pad
 
fracking near a school
Looking from the entry driveway of Fort Cherry High
School toward the Chiarelli frac of 8 wells,
about 2,500 feet from the high school.
 
One of the closest houses to the Chiarelli frac site. Notice
the sound wall doesn't enclose the pad, it was only built
on one side.
 
ADDITIONAL DATA FOR CHIARELLI #1H WELL

True Vertical Depth: 6,403 feet
Total Water Volume: 2,583,110 gallons

SOME OF THE CHEMICALS USED
Source of chemical list: FracFocus
Chemical descriptions: Multiple sources
TRADE NAME PURPOSE INGREDIENTS CHEMICAL ABSTRACT SERVICE NUMBER (CAS #)
37% HCL Cleans perforation HCL 7647-01-0
CI-100 Corrosion Inhibitor Methanol 67-56-1
   

Methanol has a high toxicity in humans. If ingested the median lethal dose is typically 4 fl oz.

    Propargyl Alcohol 107-19-7
   

Propargyl alcohol is a primary skin irritant and a severe eye and mucous membrane irritant. It is toxic by ingestion, inhalation, and skin adsorption. The oral LD50 for rats is 70 mg/kg (WARNING LABEL – Moderate Toxicity).

MC B-8520 Antibacterial Agent 4,4-Dimethyloxazolidine 51200-87-4
   

Dimethyloxazolidine has been placed in Toxicity Category I for its effects as a severe eye irritant. 4,4-Dimethyloxazolidine is slightly to moderately toxic to birds on an acute basis and slightly toxic on a subacute basis. It demonstrates slight toxicity to both cold and warm freshwater fish, and is slightly toxic to freshwater invertebrates on an acute basis.

    3,4,4-Trimethyloxazolodine 75673-43-7
    2-Amino-2-methyl-1-propanol 124-68-5
   

AMP (2-Amino-2-methyl-1-propanol) is a skin irritant, severe eye irritant, and toxic by ingestion. Causes severe irritation. Inhalation may be fatal as a result of spasm, inflammation, and edema of laryns and bronchi, chemical pneumonitis, and pulmonary edema. Symptoms of exposure may include burning sensation, coughing, wheezing, laryngitis, shortness of breath, headache, nausea and vomiting.

    Formaldehyde Amine 56652-26-7
MC B-8650 Antibacterial Agent Glutaraldehyde 111-30-8
   

The following health effects have been reported in hospital workers exposed to glutaraldehyde: Throat and lung irritation; Asthma, asthma-like symptoms, and breathing difficulty; Nose irritation, sneezing, and wheezing; Nosebleed; Burning eyes and conjunctivitis; Rash-contact and/or allergic dermatitis; Staining of the hands (brownish or tan); Hives; Headaches and Nausea.

    Methanol 67-56-1
   

Methanol has a high toxicity in humans. If ingested the median lethal dose is typically 4 fl oz.

Chemicals in Natural Gas Operations

 
Fracking chemicals
fracking chemicals
 
Fracking
Air Quality
Marcellus Shale news

In the Shadow of the Marcellus Boom (PDF offsite)
 
 

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